Fibro Flares.

This is so true! How I wish we could outrun the flares!

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Dealing with trials of drugs and treatment options – Lyrica

I have recently started Lyrica and it has been a miracle drug for me in terms of pain management. I think I am one of the lucky ones as many people have side effects that make the drug intolerable.

Liveken - my chronic life journey

Over the last week or so I’ve been really struggling with the brain fog and fatigue. My doctor and I are trialing an increase in my Lyrica doses and so far I’ve seen little to no improvement in the pain levels (the reason for the Lyrica) and a massive increase in the brain fog/fatigue department.

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I feel almost like I’ve taken a 6 month leap backwards in my mental capabilities!

It’s really hard to explain what it’s like to be on this sort of drug. My mother-in-law told me about someone in her support group who recently started Lyrica and I really liked her description… you can start off feeling fine, almost good, so you go about your day as normal but at some point you realise that you feel as if you’re high on drugs, you are completely out of it and unable to do anything…

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10 Classic Victorian Novels Everyone Should Read

Ok, so this reblog is a pure indulgence. I studied most if not all of these novels during my Undergraduate degree and have a great love of the Bronte sisters and Thomas Hardy’s Tess. Does anyone else love these? In my current Masters of Literature studies I am currently looking at popular Young Adult Fiction and woah, what a contrast. From Wuthering Heights and North and South to Twilight and Divergent! Eek.

 

Interesting Literature

Here is our list of the 10 Victorian novels we at Interesting Literature think everyone should read – whether because they’re great novels, because they tell us something important about Victorian society, because they stand as classics of the period, or (in most cases) all three. They’re not arranged in any particular order (that would be too difficult and controversial a task!). We know you, dear reader, are bound to have a different idea of what should make the top 10, so please let us know which you think we’ve given an undeserved place on this list, which we should have included but haven’t, and your suggestions for further reading for Victorianists. Oh, and tell us how many of the 10 you’ve read…

Anthony Trollope, The Warden (1855). This was Anthony Trollope’s first real success, although he was already the author of a handful of novels. His day job was…

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Information and inspiration for the chronically ill

Interesting insight into one person’s experience with chronic illness/es. There is so much still unknown about auto-immune diseases and the terrible toll they take on the sufferer and their friends and families. It is very difficult being told “but you don’t look sick” when you feel like utter rubbish and have barely been able to get out of bed. Holistic treatments are very much coming to the forefront as conventional medicine fails sufferers of these awful auto-immune diseases. I suffer from Behcet’s Syndrome and also have associated fibromyalgia. I was misdiagnosed for nearly 20 years – often believing I was going crazy as I could not get a diagnosis. I have been on various immune-suppressants which have all been a failure. I am hoping there may be some other alternatives that can lower my inflammatory levels to a normal level and I have started taking ginger and tumeric in a tablet form (Pain Ease). The wonderful Spoon Theory http://www.butyoudontlooksick.com/wpress/articles/written-by-christine/the-spoon-theory/ is a great way to try to explain how an illness such as Behcet’s, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Lupus, Fibromyalgia or any other chronic disease that depletes you of energy, controls your activities.

Everything Matters: Beyond Meds

I added another tab for the navigation menu. Thought I’d call attention to it. This one is for folks living with chronic illnesses of all kinds. I was struck physically ill from the brain-injury and systemic insult incurred by long-term  and excessive (prescribed) psychiatric drug use  and the subsequent withdrawal from the drugs (iatrogenesis). Many of my symptoms are like that of all sorts of auto-immune and other long-term chronic illness. (CFS, fibromyalgia, etc) — because in fact the drugs exacerbate or encourage such manifestation.

These are articles about learning to cope with being seriously ill and also learning to heal from such illness.

This is general information and/or personal information that has been helpful to me and may or may not apply at all to any particular given individual with whatever illness you may be coping with.

The tab and the drop down menu will be permanently at the…

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Defeating Writer’s Block 3: Do Not Edit

This is a really interesting blog entry. I find it really difficult to resist the urge to edit what I have just written and I think it does slow down creativity. I am going to try these suggestions. Happy edit-avoidance!

Broken Mirrors

I’m on this topic as I face a writer’s temptation, and to succumb to these snares sends one to the purgatory of a special kind of writer’s block. I write at a speed of approximately one chapter a night. Sometimes it’s more, often it’s less, but at a point I run into a wall and can’t move forward. At this point I take pleasure in the finer things in life, since I’ve already cleaned the house as an excuse not to write.

When I get closer to finishing, I do not appreciate this open space. I want to write all the time, dedicating every waking minute not at work to my literary pursuits, so there is now the temptation to edit. I want to print it out and start editing and fixing plot holes once I hit that wall of productive writing.

Often times, people don’t get this far without editing…

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On Writing for Free and Trying to “Make It”

Leo Howell's Blog

Deadspin published a guest article today from a former Bleacher Report intern and writer, naming many of the company’s flaws as it pertained to his quest to become a professional sports journalist.

There is some vulgar language included (It’s Deadspin, after all), but if you’d like to read the article, you can do so here.

One of the main issues the author brings up is his incredible amount of effort he put into doing all of the things that Bleacher Report asked him to do, and getting paid next to nothing to do it. There are other stories and things mentioned, including referencing the writers B/R hired during the past few years, but the overall scheme of this article, and many complaints against B/R, is the unpaid model which has helped drive the website to the top of the sports media food chain.

The idea of writing for free…

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How to Be a Writer in the Year 2014

Chicago Literati

1. Write a lot of lists.

Lists are cool. Lists are in. Lists are super easy to digest, and take very little of a potential reader’s effort, thought, or time. Throw a few funny gifs in there, and ignore the sinking feeling in your stomach when you realize gifs will eventually replace even the measly word count you’ve been assigned.

 2. Be famous for something else.

So, you wanted to write a novel or, god forbid, a short story collection? Who do you think you are—James Franco? Because unless you are literally James Franco, no one cares about your short stories. You better start filming those reality TV audition tapes, or pray to whatever higher power you believe in that your arm is bitten off by a shark.

3. Build your network.

For your sake, I hope you have a famous godfather in the entertainment industry, because if not you will repeat…

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